Archive for March, 2013

Happy Holidays from BRL Test!! :)

Happy Holidays from BRL Test!! 🙂 Have a great weekend everyone!

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Happy Holidays from BRL Test!! :)

Happy Holidays from BRL Test!! 🙂 Have a great weekend everyone!

While design for manufacturing (DFM) flows have been implemented in the industry, DFM flows at advanced CMOS nodes face several challenges that threaten widespread adoption. 

In this article by Mark Mason from Electronic Design, the question of DFM Software’s future is broached. 

Read the whole article here: Does DFM Software Have A Future?

Agilent 8561E video, specs and quotes.

Agilent 8561E video, specs and quotes.

Request a quote for Agilent 8561E Spectrum Analyzer at brltest.com or call 866-275-8378 today!

Click here for specs, quote request form, and more!

Click here for specs, quote request form, and more!

Request a quote for Agilent 8561E Spectrum Analyzer at brltest.com or call 866-275-8378 today!

Tech

I couldn’t live without an iPad Bluetooth keyboard — but there’s no one wireless iPad Bluetooth keyboard I can’t live without. Actually, I like to try as many of them as possible. And it looks like the next one I’ll be test driving is a new model from Logitech, the Keyboard Folio.

The Folio uses a keyboard similar to the one in Logitech’s Ultrathin Keyboard Cover, but builds it into a case which protects both sides of the tablet. (It’s a different design than Logitech’s existing Solar Folio— a keyboard powered by the sun — and also presumably avoids one problem I’ve had with the Ultrathin, which is the tendency of its magnets to refuse to snap snugly enough to the iPad to keep the keyboard from plopping off.) Unfolded, it lets you prop up the iPad at two different viewing angles.

[image] Logitech Keyboard Folio Mini

Logitech

A version of the Keyboard…

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Most modern spectrum analyzers have at least one method for making a time-gated measurement of the signal spectrum. The purpose of time-gated spectrum analysis is to measure the spectrum of a periodic signal during a specific portion of time. An example is to observe the spectrum of a pulsed signal only during the time that the pulse is on—not during the transitional or off periods of the burst. (In many cases, the spectral components that contribute to the pulse’s rising and falling edge will mask spectral components that contribute to the pulse’s on time.) Gating is also useful for measuring channel power, adjacent channel power, and spectral emission mask measurements of a modulated signal that is bursted in the time domain.

Time gating on these signals can often be challenging. Issues like narrow pulse widths, wide bandwidth signals, and lack of convenient gate triggers can make time gating difficult. This article examines a signal that is pulsed in the time domain. It then performs a time-gated measurement on that signal. As a result, it is possible to investigate the different types of time gating that are available and what applications are most appropriate for which methods. Gate triggering will also be examined, as well as measuring wide-bandwidth signals.

Check out the full article of How to Optimize Time Gating in Spectrum Analysis from Microwaves&RF here!

Tech

Apple may be looking to dial back the loudness in the next version of its iOS software for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

Or at least that’s supposedly the goal of Jony Ive, who heads industrial design for Apple. Now that Ive is helping guide Apple’s software teams, word is that the company may root out some of the tackier elements of iOS.

A report by the Wall Street Journal claims that Ive and his team have been working closer with Apple’s software team, and that Ive now sits in on review sessions to vet new software designs:

Some suggested that in Apple’s next mobile operating system, Ive is pushing a more “flat design” that is starker and simpler, according to developers who have spoken to Apple employees but didn’t have further details. Overall, they expect any changes to be pretty conservative.

MG Siegler, TechCrunch’s Apple columnist, backs the report

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Tech

There’s been a lot of talk and excitement about Google Glass. They’ve captured the imagination of the technorati and even garnered feedback from the mainstream media in reports that Google’s computerized eyewear might be barred in certain restaurants and bars. Clearly it’s a fascinating product and concept, though it’s harder to say if it’ll catch on or be successful beyond early adopters who love gadgets.

It’s true that solid use cases for Google Glass could develop in vertical markets, possibly for use in medicine, transportation, public safety, etc. However, at $1,500 it’s hardly a consumer device. The fact that it could take pictures, record video, deliver speech to text and put you into hangouts — even get directions — is interesting, but it would have to do a lot more for consumers to spend that sort of money out of the gate.

That’s how this works, of course: most major…

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Tech

T-Mobile has made a bold step by getting rid of two-year contracts. It’s actually not quite that simple – especially if you want an inexpensive phone – but there are savings to be found nonetheless. Here’s the skinny.

The plans are affordable, considering what you get. Fifty bucks a month will get you unlimited minutes, unlimited text messages and 500 megabytes of data. Ten bucks more gets you an additional two gigabytes of data; ten bucks more than that gets you unlimited data. Family plans start at $80 per month for two phones and top out at $210 per month for five lines and unlimited data.

All plans include unlimited text messages and the ability to use your phone as a data hotspot for your other devices, which are nice perks. Such features can cost extra on competing networks.

There are no data overages, but there’s a catch. Let’s…

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